Tower of London

Living with the Ravens

Legend has it that should the ravens ever leave the White Tower it would crumble and a great disaster would befall England…

Now, if you don’t already know, there are seven ravens that currently live at the Tower of London (the required six, plus one spare). The reason we say ‘required’ is because legend states that the Kingdom and the Tower will fall if the six resident ravens ever leave the fortress. To help people learn about the Ravens, Historic Royal Palaces asked the Ducks to tell the Ravens’ story and the accompanying legends for the Tower of London.

When at the Tower, visitors will see the new Ravens enclosure and view interpretation panels created by our friends at Headland Design. You will be invited to download the app; which tells the story of the Tower’s infamous ravens. It has been fantastic to be involved in a project for somewhere steeped in such gory, gruesome history.

Ambitious about autism

Ambitious About Autism is the national charity for children and young people with autism. They provide services at their schools and colleges; and raise awareness and understanding about autism.

We created an animation and documentary for a fundraising event at TalkTalk, to help explain autism itself and the work that the charity does.  For the animation by using characters to tell the story, we were able to convey emotion and explain the problems that children and young people with autism can come across in their every day life. With voiceover and on-screen text, we highlighted the key messages that the charity wanted to convey, in how the funding they receive can help make the ordinary possible. For the documentary we spent a day following an Ambitious College student, Conor, in his daily activities at home and at the college.

English Federation of Disability Sport

Fuzzy Duck were asked to produce a series of films that help to promote the benefits of physical activity to people with a range of disabilities and impairments. Speaking to the participants and exploring how they were able to become active, these films were used to encourage others to take up an active lifestyle.

Each film became a portrait of the person with interview clips to bring to life what their achievements are and what they gain from being active. We spent a day with each participant, speaking with them and documenting their active lives.

Using documentary filming and rich slow-motion footage these films became stand-alone pieces as well as working within a suite of films.

Talk Talk – Digital Heroes

Every year, TalkTalk choose 9 people who have used technology in extraordinary ways to help their community and beyond. These heroes ranged from a blind smart-device tutor, to a couple who make educational sing-a-long films for children with autism. Each winner is given a whopping £5,000 prize to go towards their project.

TalkTalk asked us to make a series of mini-documentaries about the winners. These films were shown online and screened in a ceremony at the Houses of Parliament, where an overall winner was chosen. The eclectic mix of heroes were an inspiration with their dedication and willingness to serve others.

 

Rugby League Cares

When your target audience are the fans of a particular sport, it gives you the freedom to have a certain shorthand and license to speak in their language and even use in-jokes. The title for this campaign is just that. The phrase ‘One in – All in’ refers to a fight on the pitch. Rugby League is built from families and close brotherhoods, where each of the players are willing to put their bodies on-the-line for each other.

If one of the players is caught in a scuffle this phrase means ‘we’ve got your back – we’re all in it together.’ This charity aims to use this same mentality throughout the fans and players alike, caring for the grass-roots and heritage of the sport, looking after players once they’ve hung up their boots and players who get injured playing.

British Canoeing

British Canoeing’s Paddle Ability campaign is all about getting people with disabilities and illness, in a kayak or canoeing and on the water. One of the people we filmed was Maya Ray, a teenager whose disability prevented her from taking part in most activities. However, kayaking has allowed her not only to stay healthy, but to surprise doctors and defy the odds by kayaking in some of the most challenging conditions.

Her message is simple; anyone can come and Kayak. Maya Ray was just one of the inspiring individuals we met when we filmed this series of short documentaries for British Canoeing’s Paddle Ability campaign. By the end of filming we got in a canoeing and started paddling ourselves.

Fuzzy Duck
Tomorrow
MediaCityUK, Salford
M50 2AB
Email: [email protected]